How to request Phase 1 Credits

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

MAEAP Phase 1 educational events are an important educational first step towards verification.  Last year there were 151 Phase 1 events with 16,708 attendees! Over 550 producers submitted phase 1 slips to start the road towards verification.   

Many of the events are submitted and/or hosted by local MAEAP technicians in partnership with other organizations.  The MAEAP grants do require that technicians hold one on-farm field day that qualifies as a phase 1.  Most technicians submit multiple events throughout the year.  Other partners (Ag Industry, Foresters, Watershed Groups, and more) can also request phase 1 credit for their meetings.  To qualify as a phase 1, check out the updated Phase 1 policy at  http://macd.org/_literature_177256/MAEAP_Phase_I_Meeting_Approval_Process  Event submissions should be emailed to me at staya@michigan.gov  


Thank you everyone!

Andrea Stay

Grants and MAEAP Training Liaison

Environmental Stewardship Division

Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

Phone: 517-285-7482

Upcoming MAEAP Trainings w/ FAS announced

Tuesday, July 03, 2018

Please see below for training dates and registration links for Summer/Fall MAEAP and partner training sessions.  Note – FAS date announced

  • Siting Short Course for MAEAP – June 29th (Gratiot County)
    This course will provide context to MAEAP technicians as to the purpose and process of the Right to Farm (RTF)  Site Selection GAAMP and the MI OFFSET 2018 Model. The Site Selection GAAMPs are very important since they are a part of both the MAEAP Livestock and Farmstead systems. This training will help you understand when a farm meets these criteria, and when an MDARD review is needed. This is not a required training, but highly encouraged for those technicians that are involved in siting questions and/or in areas with livestock expansion.  https://siting.eventbrite.com
  • Forest, Wetlands, and Habitat Risk - July 18th  (Oceana County)

This will be a great opportunity to learn more about the tool and how to work with a landowner.  The event will include a morning training session and an afternoon field visit to a nearby landowner’s property. This is a CORE training for MAEAP technicians.  Register at https://fwh2018.eventbrite.com

  • Livestock*A*Syst and Manure Management System Planning August 21-22 (Clinton/Eaton Counties)

Will be held in Clinton and Eaton Counties.  The MAEAP Livestock System Primarily focuses on environmental issues related to livestock activities, including manure handling, storage and field application, as well as conservation practices to protect water and prevent soil erosion. Mix of classroom and field visits. This is a CORE training for MAEAP technicians.  Register at https://las2018.eventbrite.com

  • Michigan Association of Conservation Districts Convention October 29-31 More details TBA
  • Farmstead *A*Syst – Nov 7 (Barry)
    The Farmstead System targets all Michigan farms, regardless of size or commodity. It is the one MAEAP system which is applicable to livestock and all the diverse cropping operations in Michigan, including traditional field crops, orchards, vegetable operations, greenhouses and nurseries. The Farmstead System addresses environmental risks of the entire farmstead, from safe handling of fuels to the proper storage of pesticides. This is a CORE training for MAEAP Technicians.  Intended audience is newer MAEAP technicians or other interested Conservation District Staff. Register at
    https://fasnov2018.eventbrite.com

Andrea Stay

Grants and MAEAP Training Liaison

Environmental Stewardship Division

Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

Phone: 517-285-7482

MAEAP color final logo COLOR with slogan

MAEAP Happenings: 5.7.18 MMSP Checklist for Livestock Specialization

Monday, May 07, 2018

MMSP Checklist for Livestock Specialization

Over the past year, several technicians have started down the road for Livestock specialization by completing Manure Management System Plans (MMSPs) to have them reviewed by MAEAP and RTF staff.  Through this process, internally we have come together to create a checklist to be more consistent with what is expected to document expertise towards a livestock specialization.  This checklist goes beyond what Right to Farm requires to close a complaint to prove the technician has extensive knowledge and abilities in this area.  This checklist is also meant to make the process more predictable for all parties involved. This is effective today, 5/3/18 and will be used by both MAEAP technicians that are working towards specialization, and by MDARD staff when they review the submitted plans.  Technicians that are interested in submitting a plan for review should submit to me, and I will route for review. 

There are two documents for you to review

  1. The MAEAP specialization policy that shows what is expected to achieve
  2. The newly created “MMSP for Livestock Specialization Checklist”

Thank you all for your input as we have worked towards improving our service internally and externally to producers. 

If you have any questions, please let me know. 

Andrea Stay

Grants and MAEAP Training Liaison

Environmental Stewardship Division

Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

Phone: 517-285-7482

MAEAP color final logo COLOR with slogan



5.3.18 Managing Farm Stress Webinar Resource

Thursday, May 03, 2018

Communicating with farmers under stress

Stress becomes especially palpable when commodity prices are low, and caring for your own health and wellness in this high-stress profession is as important as caring for your bottom line.

In 2016, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health examined 130 occupations and found laborers and farm owners had the highest rate of deaths due to stress-related conditions like heart and artery disease, hypertension, ulcers and nervous disorder. It is important to know how to manage stress levels and to reduce the effects of unwanted stress. Too much stress can make a person more accident-prone. This is why it is important to identify common stressors, recognize the symptoms of stress and manage stress. By doing these three things, you will make the work place safer.

Stress is a normal emotional response to the demands of life. Everyone experiences it, and the results vary in intensity from being in a foul mood to more complicated illnesses. In fact, it is estimated by Family Development Resources, Inc. That 75 percent to 90 percent of all illnesses are stress related.

Over the last couple years it has been difficult for farm families in Michigan. Many are experiencing financial and emotional stress as a result. There are several signs or symptoms when a farm family may be in need of help. These signs can be observed by friends, extended family members, neighbors, milk haulers, veterinarians, clergy persons, school personnel or health and human service workers.

Michigan State University Extension has helped in the development of a webinar specially designed for people who work with agricultural producers and farm families who want to know more about managing farm-related stress and learn ways to approach and communicate with those in need. The 90 minute webinar will include specialist and educators discussing the present agricultural market situation with an overview of how this has affected a farm’s financial situation and cash flow, communicating with farmers in financial distress and the detrimental impact of stress on our body and state of mind, providing information on how to recognize some of the warning signs of depression, self-harm and mental illness. Information and registration for the March 27, 2018 webinar can be found at the Extension Zoom website.

To find an upcoming workshop in your area or arrange for a workshop to be delivered at your organization or business, contact Suzanne Pish; pishs@anr.msu.edu also visit the Managing Farm Stress website.